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Samorost 2 Level B1

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 One of my experiments using games in school was to play Samorost 2 and review for the final exam. 

The group consisted of 18  students between 18 and 57 years old with level B1 in English as a foreign language. We used the computer room at school. For the 120 minute lesson we needed The game amanita-design.net , online dictionary www.leo.org and verb wheel 4foot30.com      

First I introduced the game, the dictionary and the verb wheel  and made teams. Then I handed out papers with questions on the game. The questions had to be answered as students played along. Read how it went.

The beginning: I had to help with instructions on what to do, where to click and go at the beginning, it seemed just chaos for five minutes. Originally I had planned to put the students in teams of four, but that didn't work.Teams of two were perfect. I had to explain personally what to do to each team.

The students even played without my walkthrough youtube.com  later on. They played twice, the second time in order to answer the questions I had prepared with hints for the game (in case they got stuck) they didn't even see the hints. In the second exercise students had to write a blog telling their friends about their adventure using past, present and future tenses.

Feedback:

Two of 18 students complained: One lady of 26 told me we had lost time explaining what to do and said that she hadn't understood the story, she doesn't like computers. For her it was not a lesson for grown up people.A young man of 18 kept moaning loudly about the "silly game" he then stopped playing and was appointed by his team to do the writing instead, he had to answer the questions and use the verb wheel, the team told me they had enjoyed the game very much.That was the first time ever that the group takes care of a disruptive classmate.Isn't that a sign that they really were interested and wanted to work in peace?The group liked the game and even played until you have to pay to continue (much longer than I had planned) I had prepared the game only until the gnome breaks the pipeline and enters the cave.Two older students, a lady of 57 and a man of 42 loved the game and asked if they could play it at home too, they were sad when they had to stop. The blogs the group wrote were all very nice. I believe it helped to review the tenses and some of the vocabulary before the exam. Next term I am going to use the game again. amanita-design.net   4foot30.com          www.leo.org

 
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